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Dixon Bergman – Solo Art Exhibition

Light Space & Time Online Art Gallery is very extremely to announce that Dixon Bergman has been selected as one of the four artists of the gallery’s recent tenth “Solo Art Series” Art Competition.  Dixon will now have a month-long solo art exhibition and he will be featured on the gallery’s front page, in the Gallery’s YouTube Channel, as well as in the “Solo Art Series” archive.

Dixon Bergman is a professional 3-Dimensional artist based in Plymouth, Massachusetts and he specializes in creating 3D Cubist Masterpieces for the visually impaired.  It is Dixon’s desire to create finished works that look like exact reproductions to sighted folks and to a visually impaired person could understand and enjoy, through touch.  Dixon will now be promoted by the gallery with an extensive public relations campaign.

This solo exhibition will distribute, promote and circulate press releases to over 550+ major News Outlets, Premium FOX, CBS, NBC, and Affiliated Sites, with guaranteed inclusion on Google News & Bing News and social media distribution through LST gallery’s broad social media network.

In addition, as part of his award package, Dixon will now be featured as a Light Space & Time – Artwork Archive promoted artist.   Dixon’s art will also be featured on the gallery’s YouTube Channel and with an event postcard.

The “Solo Art Series” is a series of monthly solo art exhibitions for established artists who have a body of work to present to the public.  Artist participants were asked to submit the following 3 components for the “Solo Art Series” competition; 1.  Their art.  2.  Their artist biography.  3.  Their artist statement.  These elements were evaluated and judged, which resulted in the selection of the artists who will be featured in individual month-long solo art exhibitions.  This was the tenth “Solo Art Series” Art Competition that the gallery has conducted.

Below is Dixon’s Artist Biography, his Artist Statement, along with 15 of his 3D art creations.  We hope that you will take the time to read Dixon’s information and to take a look at his unique and Cubist-inspired art.

Artist Biography:

Dixon Bergman is a Plymouth, Massachusetts contemporary artist and oil painter who often uses his camera and computer to create digital art. In 2014, after looking at early works of cubist artist Juan Gris, Dixon was inspired to take the leap from flat canvasses into three dimensions.

At that point, he began reproducing 3D Museum Cubist Masterpieces that both visually impaired and sighted people could enjoy. His work was constructed using a flat panel made of wood as the “canvas.” Design elements were glued to the substrate piece-by-piece, layer upon layer. Surfaces were smoothed, carefully blended and primed before color was applied … all in an attempt to be faithful both to the color palette and brush textures of the original painting.

The finished works looked like exact reproductions to sighted folks… and a visually impaired person could understand and enjoy, through touch, the subtleties of the design created by some of the world’s greatest artists: Picasso, Gris, Braque, Feininger, and Klee, among others.

Today, Dixon considers himself a “Constructionist.” His work continues along a cubist path but has transitioned into truly unique and inspiring 3-Dimensional creations. Found objects receive new life as he works them into complicated and often times surprising art themes providing the art enthusiast with refreshing visual and tactile treats.

Dixon has an engineering degree from Union College and has done graduate study at Yale School of Art and Architecture. In business Dixon has developed countless advertising campaigns and public relations programs. Operating as a one-man ad agency, he has provided technical writing, designed and produced requisite collateral material, including print advertisements, catalogs, brochures, annual reports, and internet graphics.  His work has been exhibited with numerous regional art associations.

Artist Statement:

I like old stuff and can spend hours in thrift stores, junky antique shops and Goodwill outlets hunting through the rubble. The more clutter the better.

One day, after finding (and buying for six dollars) an old, damaged guitar that someone had painted blue, I found myself in a flash-back mode to a college art history course. Topic? Cubism. Hey, why not see what Picasso’s painting of the “Blue Guitar” might actually become in three dimensions!

Back in the studio, I soon had my table saw ripping through the guitar. Jigsaw blades humming promising new life into pieces of scrap wood. Sandpaper sanding edges while wood filler was filling gaps. And, of course, glue was dripping onto my bench everywhere. When my excitement quieted, I mounted the creature on a 34″ x 24″ wood panel and applied makeup tones faithful to Picasso’s blue oils palette.

That was the beginning of my “constructionist” direction. Today I continue along a cubist path forming found objects into 3–D sculptures that magnify the essence (and splendor) of each of its parts. For example, I once disassembled a piano and found the magnificent complexities of its construction. The amazing workmanship . . . the theme, variations, and rhythms of the parts. The elements of that beauty deserved to be out in the sunshine for all to see. So I used many of those wonderful elements to form a sculpture named My Be Flat Piano. It measured 24″ x 36″ x 3″. Flat indeed!

Many sculptures later, my raw materials inventory has grown to include violins, printed circuit boards, piano action racks, trumpets, harps, old clocks, alphabet blocks, a collection of toys, and boxes of flotsam and jetsam. Today, I hope you enjoy seeing many of these familiar items in their new form, one-of-a-kind combinations that bring traditional cubism out into the realm of the third dimension.  Dixon’s website: www.dixondoesit.com   
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